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6 interview questions that you should never ask

During an interview, although the company are assessing whether you will be a good fit for the team, you are also making sure the company and role will suit you and your lifestyle. To gain as much as you need to during your interview, it’s important to have a back pocket of interview questions for your future employer. While most of your questions may be smart and well-considered, there are some questions that are red flags for interviewers. 

To make sure your winning interview doesn’t go south, here’s the questions you should avoid asking at all costs.

What does the person do in this role?

A detailed job description is usually always provided with any job application and should outline the key responsibilities required of the successful candidate. Asking this question suggests a lack of enthusiasm and interest in the role from not having read the job description properly. If you do have require additional information about the role, ask for this prior to the interview as you want to know what you’re signing up for.

What does the company do?

Rule number one of entering any job interview is having a good background knowledge of the company behind you. Not only will asking this question show that you haven’t spent the time to do any research , it could also make the interviewer question your capability to do the job.

Do you have any other positions apart from this one?

This question displays arrogance in your abilities to do any job. It also shows a lack of interest in the role at hand.

although the company are assessing whether you will be a good fit for the team, you are also making sure the company and role will suit you and your lifestyle.

Will I have long hours?

Although it is important to find out what your working hours will be, this question could make you come off as being lazy. Instead, ask the question ‘What are the working hours for this role?’ or ‘Is there a positive work-life balance?’

How much holiday do you offer?

Any benefits you receive with the job will be discussed once you receive a job offer and not discussed in the interview. Asking questions around what benefits you will receive can undermine the interest you have in the role and might make it look like you assume you have succeeded in landing the position.

What will my salary be?

Salaries are usually displayed on the job advert to give you a rough idea as to what you can expect. Any questions surrounding the salary should be discussed at the time of the job offer and not during the interview.

Check out our Career Advice page for more in-depth insights to getting yourself ready for your next

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